The Hello Bar is a simple web toolbar that engages users and communicates a call to action.

Behind the Scenes of a Newspaper as it Says Goodbye

People are turning to forms of new media to get their news now.  I don’t ever read a printed newspaper.  I don’t even watch the news on TV (partially because I gave up cable).  Why?  I’m able to get all of the same information online, but instead of just from one source, I can get it from hundreds or thousands of other sources.  One of my favorite sites for many years has been Google News for that very feature.  Also, if I do want to catch up on the news, I can watch shortened clips on many of the major television sites now (CNN being my favorite).  As with everything in my life, there is a equal reaction that has been set in motion by this convergence to new forms of media.

It seems as though each week the news gets darker for newspaper companies.  Traditional printed newspapers are racing to transform themselves while at the same time trying to, at least, retain their customer base.  Couple this with the tough economic times that we are currently going through, and it’s no wonder why Paul Gillin is able to update his blog on this very topic, Newspaper Death Watch, so often.  One of the recent subjects of many conversations, both on Paul’s blog and elsewhere, was the death of the Rocky Mountain News.  I was familiar with the newspaper and had read it before while traveling or because of my role with my former company.

After reading Paul’s article on it, I clicked over to the Rocky Mountain News site and came across the below behind the scenes video of the newspaper and it’s staff during its final weeks.  This is the reality of what is happening to many newspapers around the country.  There are many newspapers that won’t even make the national radar that are closing up and many that are going through their final weeks, months and definitely, years.

If you can’t see the video, you can watch it here.

What are your thoughts on what is happening with newspaper companies?  Can they be saved?  How?

If you enjoyed this post, please consider leaving a comment or subscribing to the feed to receive future articles delivered to your feed reader.
  • http://twitter.com/justinlevy justinlevy

    Behind the scenes of a newspaper as it says goodbye – http://bit.ly/DqFSB

    This comment was originally posted on Twitter

  • http://www.springboardpr.com Domenick Cilea

    This video is very sad and unfortunatley the harsh reality of the print-based publishing business, especially in the current economic environment. The Rocky Mountain News staff did not fail their readership, their business model did.

    With the exception of Sundays, I read most of my news online, from a range of sources. Instead of reading a newspaper cover-to-cover in the morning, today’s “wired” world allows people to get their news in bite-sized pieces throughout the day.

    The “editorial” business is evolving, transforming and in many cases, like the Rocky Mountain News fleeting. The strong will survive and new models will emerge. Perhaps there will be a “Newspaper 2.0,” and hopefully the people in this video (and the industry as a whole) will be a part of shaping it.

  • http://marshalsandler.com/ marshal sandler

    This a excellent article article- I am 72 years old and have not subscribed to a newspaper or magazine in 5 years let alone read one, My wife Naomi and I have 2 kindles for food news ,she reads Gotham Gal Blog and we also read Zimbio on line- Today for example Fred Wilson had an excellent business article on his blog http://www.avc.com/a_vc/2009/03/the-berkshire-hathaway-2008-annual-letter.html Dominic’s comment is interesting but isn’t the business model people-staff-The Boss.The Old Media publishes murder crime stats pic pocket politics. Tv News is just a copy of poorly written newspaper content-and PAY TV is hours of info-mercials-there is no saving newspapers as we knew them they are as dead as Custer-years ago I read 3 major newspapers a day I don’t miss them. I think when Craigs List grabbed the majority of classifieds for the SFC this was the first old media warning-they chose to ignore it !

  • http://marshalsandler.com/ marshal sandler

    This a excellent article article- I am 72 years old and have not subscribed to a newspaper or magazine in 5 years let alone read one, My wife Naomi and I have 2 kindles for food news ,she reads Gotham Gal Blog and we also read Zimbio on line- Today for example Fred Wilson had an excellent business article on his blog http://www.avc.com/a_vc/2009/03/the-berkshire-hathaway-2008-annual-letter.html Dominic’s comment is interesting but isn’t the business model people-staff-The Boss.The Old Media publishes murder crime stats pic pocket politics. Tv News is just a copy of poorly written newspaper content-and PAY TV is hours of info-mercials-there is no saving newspapers as we knew them they are as dead as Custer-years ago I read 3 major newspapers a day I don’t miss them. I think when Craigs List grabbed the majority of classifieds for the SFC this was the first old media warning-they chose to ignore it !

  • Pingback: Behind the Scenes of a Newspaper as it Says Goodbye | Justin R. Levy

  • http://GlobalPatriot.com Global Patriot

    I’m reminded of a conversation with my grandfather many years ago, as he lamented the arrival of commercial aviation and the resulting downturn in the fortunes of the railroad industry. It’s a sad transition, to be sure, but one that is driven by changes in technology and the habits of the general public.

    It may be that the future of newspapers is confined to small towns and a handful of very large publications that focus on the Sunday paper. I think the nostalgia of the that trend will remain for years to come, but it’s hard to say how many years.

    Global Patriot’s last blog post..Gary Vaynerchuk Interview – It’s About The People

  • http://GlobalPatriot.com Global Patriot

    I’m reminded of a conversation with my grandfather many years ago, as he lamented the arrival of commercial aviation and the resulting downturn in the fortunes of the railroad industry. It’s a sad transition, to be sure, but one that is driven by changes in technology and the habits of the general public.

    It may be that the future of newspapers is confined to small towns and a handful of very large publications that focus on the Sunday paper. I think the nostalgia of the that trend will remain for years to come, but it’s hard to say how many years.

    Global Patriot’s last blog post..Gary Vaynerchuk Interview – It’s About The People

  • http://twitter.com/globalpatriot globalpatriot

    A sad transition, as the newspaper business model collapses, but time & technology march on http://twurl.nl/ijcqil

    This comment was originally posted on Twitter

  • Jason

    I work for a small town newspaper in NY. I hear these stories on a daily basis and often think if we are next. What bothers me isn’t the fact that the newspaper business model may be failing, it’s that the world feels that untrained bloggers (that seriously lack in writing capabilities) can replace well written, well researched stories written by reporters.

    When we were all kids, we enjoyed seeing our pictures in the local paper and then taping them to our refridgerator doors. It was something to be proud of. Do people think printing off a blog from the internet will give you that same feeling?

    When you are wondering why you can’t find local news, you realize that there isn’t any anymore…the big news companies like CNN, FOX…their primary focus is larger more nationally impacting stories. Not your kid making the winning goal at your local high school soccer tournament.

    My point is, is that when there comes a time that newspapers no longer exist, it’s going to be a sad world having to lose the feel of a newspaper on a Sunday morning while drinking your coffee.

  • Jason

    I work for a small town newspaper in NY. I hear these stories on a daily basis and often think if we are next. What bothers me isn’t the fact that the newspaper business model may be failing, it’s that the world feels that untrained bloggers (that seriously lack in writing capabilities) can replace well written, well researched stories written by reporters.

    When we were all kids, we enjoyed seeing our pictures in the local paper and then taping them to our refridgerator doors. It was something to be proud of. Do people think printing off a blog from the internet will give you that same feeling?

    When you are wondering why you can’t find local news, you realize that there isn’t any anymore…the big news companies like CNN, FOX…their primary focus is larger more nationally impacting stories. Not your kid making the winning goal at your local high school soccer tournament.

    My point is, is that when there comes a time that newspapers no longer exist, it’s going to be a sad world having to lose the feel of a newspaper on a Sunday morning while drinking your coffee.

  • http://www.springboardpr.com Domenick Cilea

    This video is very sad and unfortunatley the harsh reality of the print-based publishing business, especially in the current economic environment. The Rocky Mountain News staff did not fail their readership, their business model did.

    With the exception of Sundays, I read most of my news online, from a range of sources. Instead of reading a newspaper cover-to-cover in the morning, today's “wired” world allows people to get their news in bite-sized pieces throughout the day.

    The “editorial” business is evolving, transforming and in many cases, like the Rocky Mountain News fleeting. The strong will survive and new models will emerge. Perhaps there will be a “Newspaper 2.0,” and hopefully the people in this video (and the industry as a whole) will be a part of shaping it.